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CAHNR in the news

Students with mobile devicesAgriculture in America reported on what Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR) is doing about climate issues. One of the solutions is the Climate Corps course, which gives students a real world experience and benefits the community. Extension Educator Chet Arnold was quoted. He is the Department of Extension in Middlesex County and CLEAR.

By Patsy Evans

Historical image of the week

North Eagleville Road

North Eagleville Road. Two wagon with drivers and teams in foreground and another in the background. First team and wagon wheels sinking in the mud of North Eagleville Road. By Jerauld A. Manter, 1918. From the University of Connecticut Photograph Collection.

Meet undergraduate student Stephen Hnatuk

Stephen Hnatuk

Stephen Hnatuk is working to chart his course to the future, by being extremely involved within the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources. Driven by his passion for the environment, he has created a variety of opportunities for himself. Stephen enjoys learning about water resources, our environment and the world. Read more about Stephen’s experiences as a UConn Student.

What attracted you to UConn? I came to UConn undecided about what I wanted to study. I knew UConn would have a lot of opportunities for me to explore. I was also attracted to the wide variety of clubs and academic programs available.

What is your major, and why did you choose it? I am double majoring in natural resources and the environment and applied resource economics. I chose this path because I have always had a love for the outdoors and conservation. When I was in high school, I took a marine science course, which opened my eyes to a lot of environmental issues. I discovered that I was interested in water and saw its importance as a resource for life in our world.

Which one of your UConn activities, internships or jobs was the most memorable? Why? Since the beginning of the summer, I have been interning at the United States Geological Survey. I have appreciated being able to apply the knowledge and skills I have learned in school. For this internship, I do a lot of field work, including taking discharge measurements in streams and rivers. I enjoy being able to engage in problem solving at this internship. There is always something new that I’m unprepared for, but I like taking on the challenges. (more…)

The Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics: An overview

Rigoberto Lopez

Rigoberto Lopez

As of June 2017, the College’s Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ARE) was ranked nineteenth worldwide among university agricultural economics departments, a significant achievement for a relatively small department competing with departments at much larger institutions such as Ohio State University, the University of Illinois and Purdue.

“Our goal is to continue our status as a premiere department of agricultural and resource economics, committed to excellence in teaching, research and extension,” says Rigoberto Lopez, professor and department head. “ARE is uniquely positioned within UConn, as a nexus between biological and physical sciences and the social and policy sciences.”

ARE is home to the Charles J. Zwick Center for Food and Resource Policy, which focuses on solutions to high-priority problems related to food, health, natural resources and the environment. The center is named for Charles J. Zwick, an alumnus and benefactor of the department. A distinguished scholar, public servant and business leader, Zwick served on the faculty at UConn and at Harvard University and was director of OMB during President Johnson’s administration. After leaving government service, Zwick served as president, CEO and chairman of the board of trustees for the Southeast Banking Corporation.

Recent Zwick Center activities include a pilot project involving graduate and undergraduate students to collect data on low-income households in Willimantic; co-funding a new portable economic laboratory; presentations to the Connecticut Farm Bureau and the Connecticut Department of Agriculture detailing the economic impacts of Connecticut’s agricultural industry; and funding a study on the impacts of diet quality and food consumption behavior by low-income households.

ARE encourages and supports research collaborations with other units, including the College’s Departments of Natural Resources and the Environment, Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, Extension, and the UConn School of Engineering. The department also partners with UConn’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity in its mission to improve public health issues related to food. (more…)

Image of the week

Kousa dogwoods produce edible aggregate fruits that vary in fleshiness (juiciness) according to cultivars. Fruits from this particular tree are very large, sweet and juicy. Fruits are evident on kousa dogwoods well into November this year.

Kousa dogwood from UConn plant database.
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