CAHNR in the news

newsprintUSA Today quoted Department of Allied Health Associate Professor Jennifer Harris about children and fast food consumption.

UConn Today included an article by Jaci Van Heest, associate professor of educational psychology in the Neag School of Education with a joint appointment in kinesiology in the College of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources. She wrote about the use of wearable activity monitors by Olympic athletes and how the devices help them, their coaches and sport scientists.

aaptiv.com gave advice from Distinguished Professor Linda Pescatello about how exercise can lower blood pressure. Pescatello is on the faculty of kinesiology.

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Meet undergraduate student Risa Lewis

Risa Lewis
Risa Lewis

Risa Lewis is fascinated by economics, particularly environmental and behavioral economics. She’s an Honors student, majoring in applied and resource economics in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics. She’s interested in food sustainability and the behavioral side of economics as it relates to changing perceptions about sustainable environmental policy. Lewis is minoring in English and American Sign Language (ASL), yet still finds time to play competitive Frisbee as part of the UConn club team. Read more about Risa’s experiences as a UConn student.

What attracted you to UConn? I think, overall, the down-to-earth vibe, the location that meant easy access to an escape into the surrounding nature and the great variety of classes that come with a university of UConn’s size. My major is not something I found in many schools; likewise, my desire to continue learning ASL and about the Deaf community was realized in the great program UConn has, which is rare. I like to bring my own intensity to my studies and hobbies, and, to me, UConn had the resources and setting for that. Continue reading

Ph.D. candidate studies interaction of intestine and immune system cardiovascular inflammation

Cayla Rodia
Cayla Rodia

In the world of immunology, the gut is garnering new respect. Cayla Rodia, a doctoral student in the Department of Nutritional Sciences, is fascinated with the intestine’s involvement with the immune system.

“I love the intestine and I really think it is the most underrated organ,” Rodia says. “People used to think it was simply for digestion, but we’re learning it has so many interconnected abilities. Seventy percent of the immune system is in the gut.”

“The gut immune system is in constant contact with potential antigens,” she continues. “That system has to be working correctly to prevent inflammatory or immune responses elsewhere.”

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