Awards and achievements in CAHNR

From Stacey and Laura Brown:

Hi Bonnie and Stacey- I may have shared this news before but at the 2020 IEDC annual conference, the Best Practice in Land Use and Economic Development Certification program was awarded a bronze award for Innovation Programs and Initiatives by the International Economic Development Council (IEDC). This is a great honor!

Below you’ll find the release sent by CEDAS. Feel free to share widely! 

Here are the program sites: https://communities.extension.uconn.edu/bestpractices/ and for applicants https://www.cedas.org/Resources/CT-Best-Practices-In-Land-Use-and-Economic-Development/

 

CEDAS RECEIVES EXCELLENCE IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AWARD FROM THE INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL

10/19/2020

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE               

October 19, 2020

Contact: Beth Scanlon, 203-946-3782, info@cedas.org                           

 

Washington, DC  –  Connecticut Economic Development Association (CEDAS) won a Bronze Rank for its Best Practices in Land Use and Economic Development Certification Program, a project in the category of Innovation Programs and Initiatives of the International Economic Development Council (IEDC).  The honor was presented at an awards ceremony during the IEDC Annual Conference, which took place last week.

 

CEDAS is Connecticut’s economic development professional association, and it is led by a volunteer board of directors.  The best practices program was put together as a response to slow economic growth in Connecticut.  Garrett Sheehan, CEDAS President said, “I want to thank IEDC for this recognition and all of our CEDAS members who helped build this program from the ground up.  It was a truly collaborative process, working with planners and economic developers from many towns to create the criteria.” 

 

In 2019, 24 communities were accredited through the program.  Certification in 2020 was cancelled due to the pandemic, but is scheduled to resume in 2021.  CEDAS partnered with other organizations for the 2019 launch including:  Advance CT, Connecticut Chapter of the American Planning Association, and the University of Connecticut-Department of Extension. The support from sponsors Eversource, UI, Pullman & Comley, and STV/DPM.

 

“The primary goal of this program has always been to raise the standard for economic development in Connecticut,” Sheehan said.  “Our municipalities are very different, but the basic principles of good economic development are applicable across all of our communities. By being great economic developers at the local level we can drive growth that is inclusive for our entire state.”

 

IEDC’s Excellence in Economic Development Awards recognize the world’s best economic development programs and partnerships, marketing materials, and the year’s most influential leaders. 35 award categories honor organizations and individuals for their efforts in creating positive change in urban, suburban, and rural communities. Awards are judged by a diverse panel of economic and community developers from around the world, following a nomination process held earlier this year. IEDC received over 500 submissions from 4 countries.

 

In 2019, The Connecticut Economic Development Association (CEDAS), the state’s professional association of economic developers, created a unique certification program to encourage best practices in municipal economic development and land use in collaboration with the Connecticut Chapter of the American Planning Association (CCAPA) and the University of Connecticut Department of Extension. The program encourages municipalities to make continuous improvements to land use and economic development practices, ultimately improving economic opportunities and quality of life for residents. The program requires an application to be completed documenting various economic development and land use practices, policies, and programs taking place at the municipal level. In its first year, 24 municipalities statewide were certified under the program as demonstrating these best practices.

 

The program is intended to drive communities to pursue excellence in land use and economic development practices and to recognize the communities that have established best practices. In pursuit of these best practices, planners and economic developers use this program to engage community stakeholders in discussions about how to achieve higher standards and develop creative, community-specific ways to implement them.

 

“The winners of IEDC’s Excellence in Economic Development awards represent the very best of economic development and exemplify the ingenuity, integrity, and leadership that our profession strives for each and every day”, said 2020 IEDC Board Chair and One Columbus CEO Kenny McDonald. “We’re honored to recognize the more than 100 communities whose marketing campaigns, projects and partnerships have measurably improved regional quality of life.”

 

About the International Economic Development Council

 

The International Economic Development Council (IEDC) is a non-profit, non-partisan membership organization serving economic developers. With more than 5,000 members, IEDC is the largest organization of its kind. Economic developers promote economic well-being and quality of life for their communities, by creating, retaining and expanding jobs that facilitate growth, enhance wealth and provide a stable tax base. From public to private, rural to urban and local to international, IEDC’s members are engaged in the full range of economic development experience. Given the breadth of economic development work, our members are employed in a wide variety of settings including local, state, provincial and federal governments, public-private partnerships, chambers of commerce, universities and a variety of other institutions. When we succeed, our members create high-quality jobs, develop vibrant communities, and improve the quality of life in their regions. Learn more at iedconline.org.

CAHNR in the news

Students ReadingScience Magazine quoted Douglas Casa, professor in the Department of Kinesiology and chief executive officer of the Korey Stringer Institute, on his research. Casa studies how bodies react to the stress of working in the heat and tests protective measures.

UConn Today featured Rich Mutts ’06 (CLAS), program director of the Meriden Children First Initiative, and his work to recruit participants in UConn People Empowering People (UConn PEP), a UConn Extension program. UConn PEP is an innovative personal and family development program with a strong community focus. It builds on the unique strengths and life experiences of the participants, emphasizing connections between individuals and community action.

UConn Magazine featured the poultry research of Kumar Venkitanarayanan, an animal science professor and the associate dean for research and graduate education in CAHNR. His research, which was recently awarded a $10 million grant from the USDA, seeks to raise chickens without the use of antibiotics.

Allied Health Sciences Professor Sherry Pagoto was quoted in Healio on her research, which aims to use social media to create and deliver evidence-based weight loss intervention programs. Pagoto are studying the types of engagement on Facebook and Twitter that might lead to success for online programs. Continue reading

Meet undergraduate student Jacqueline Cuevas Gonzales

Jacqueline Cuevas Gonzales, wearing a white t-shirt, stands outside on a sunny day, with a white fence and flower bed in the background.
Jacqueline Cuevas Gonzales

Jacqueline Cuevas Gonzales plans a career as a physician’s assistant, preferably in a hospital or clinical setting. She chose the Department of Allied Health Sciences (AHS) because it offers options in many healthcare fields. She has a strong desire to do something positive with her life and make a difference in the world. She says that students her age, particularly first-generation students, feel an extra weight of expectation to achieve success. Her twin sister is a student in the department as well. Read more about Gonzales’s experiences as a UConn student.

What attracted you to the UConn College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources?

Even though I started my educational career at UConn in the Academic Center  for Exploratory Students, I decided to declare a major in CAHNR because I have always been passionate about helping others and learning more about health and medicine on a broader level, which AHS would allow me to do. Continue reading

Exercise scientist’s research focuses on muscle and tendon health and function in athletes and older adults

In fall 2019, Jacob Earp hosts a visiting Chinese Winter Olympic Delegation at the University of Rhode Island for a two-week sports science colloquium where renown scientists, sports physicians and coaches share their expertise to aid in preparations for the 2022 Beijing Games.
In fall 2019, Jacob Earp (center, in white shirt) hosts a visiting Chinese Winter Olympic Delegation at the University of Rhode Island for a two-week sports science colloquium where renowned scientists, sports physicians and coaches share their expertise to aid in preparations for the 2022 Beijing Games.

This past August, Jacob Earp joined the Department of Kinesiology in the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources as an assistant professor. He is happy to return to UConn, having earned his MA from the department.

“It feels great to be back at UConn. The school has wonderful resources for both faculty and students,” he says.

Earp’s research focuses on muscle and tendon health and function with the goal of improving muscle quality, physical function and recovery after injury. His background focused on working with athletes, but he plans to expand his research to include older adults. Continue reading