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Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

CAHNR in the news

Students with mobile devicesMen’s Health cited a research paper by student William Martin, Professor Lawrence Armstrong and Professor Nancy Rodriguez.  The paper studied dietary protein intake and renal function. Martin and Rodriguez are part of nutritional sciences while Armstrong is in kinesiology.

The Day reported that UConn Extension will have a nonvoting seat on the board of directors for  the Thames River Innovation Place (TRIP) in order to help design TRIP’s evaluation and assessment process.

Crookston Times announced that the new University of Minnesota Crookston Chancellor is Mary Holz-Clause, a former assistant dean and director of global programs in CAHNR.

Weather.com quoted Associate Professor Paulo Verardi about tick-born illnesses and vaccines for them. Verardi does research in vaccine development in the Department of Pathobiology and Veterinary Science.

Runner’s World described research that studied the role of vitamin D in blood pressure during rest and maximal exercise. Authors of the study include graduate student Amanda L. Zaleski, Distinguished Professor Linda Pescatello, Associate Professor Beth Taylor and former graduate student Braden Armstrong. All are from the Department of Kinesiology.

By Patsy Evans

Historical image of the week

Laboratory Glass Blowing

Laboratory Glass Blowing. 1940–1949. From the University of Connecticut Photograph Collection.

CAHNR in the news

newspaper readersAOL posted a video of Ashley Kalinauskas, who founded the company behind a treatment that helps dogs, cats and horses combat cancer. Kalinauskas earned a bachelor’s degree in pathobiology and veterinary sciences.

MySA included an article about summer interns at the Connecticut Audubon Society. One of them, Helena Ives, tracks the populations of threatened coastal birds, such as the piping plover. Ives is a student in natural resources and the environment.

Times Union reported on the implications of research done by Professor Mark Brand for New York state plant sellers.  Brand’s development of four infertile, seedless barberry varieties will allow residents to buy a favorite landscaping plant that is not invasive like the other, older varieties. Brand is part of plant science and landscape architecture. (more…)

Scientists investigate effects of sea level rise on coastal wetlands

Coastal Wetlands - Hammonasset

Coastal wetlands in Hammonasset Beach State Park in Madison, CT.

If you are heading to the beach this summer, you are likely to pass by coastal wetlands on your way to the shore. These wetlands vary from bottomland hardwoods to marshes to seagrass beds but all occur at the intersection of land and sea, where fresh water from land meets saline tidal waters.

Coastal wetlands provide an array of ecosystem services. They protect shores from flooding, erosion and storm surge; provide habitat for wildlife; filter pollutants from water and sequester carbon. A group of researchers led by Assistant Professor Beth Lawrence of the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment (NRE) and UConn’s Center for Environmental Science and Engineering (CESE) is studying and quantifying the ecosystem services of carbon and nitrogen cycling to determine how these areas are responding to rising oceans.

The coast of the eastern United States is expected to experience elevated levels of sea level rise compared to the global average. Several factors, including water temperature, salinity, currents, the melting of glaciers and ice sheets and various geological and geographical elements, affect the rate of sea level rise. Scientists forecast global sea level rise in the range of 8 inches to 6.6 feet by 2100. The pace at which and amount the oceans rise will depend largely upon carbon and methane emissions that accelerate the melting of the planet’s ice and increase ocean temperatures. Heat causes water to expand, further escalating sea level rise. (more…)

CAHNR in the news

Students with mobile devicesScientific American highlighted the work of Assistant Professor Melissa McKinney with polar bears. The Department of Natural Resources and the Environment faculty member found that as sea ice disappears, the bears move to land and change their basic diet. As a result, the researchers saw a 65 percent drop in the polar bears’ mercury levels. See also Popular Science. 6-15-17 and the research publication.

UConn Today interviewed Associate Extension Professor Thomas Worthley about the current gypsy moth invasion and the effects on trees. He is part of the Department of Extension in Middlesex County.

Hartford Courant quoted Carol Quish in an article about cleaning gypsy moth caterpillar frass off driveways and decks. Quish is a program aide in plant science and landscape architecture. (more…)