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Archive for the ‘Health’ Category

Famed chef to address May graduates

DAVID BOULEY PORTRAIT

David Bouley will be the CAHNR commencement speaker on May 6.

Award-winning New York chef and restaurateur, David Bouley, will speak at CAHNR’s May 6 undergraduate commencement ceremonies. Bouley’s rise to fame started near Storrs, where he was born and raised. “The values of New England became my early core of standards,” Bouley said in his acceptance letter to UConn’s President Susan Herbst.

Life on his grandparents’ farm and his French heritage gave Bouley an appreciation for healthful meals and fresh ingredients, which he retains to this day. The goals and results of his approach to food and health will figure prominently in his speech to about 1,000 CAHNR graduates and their guests.

In addition, Bouley will receive a doctorate of humane letters, honoris causa, from UConn at commencement. As an example of how Bouley meets the criteria of the honorary degree, Herbst said in her communication with him, “As a chef and catalyst for creative change in the kitchen, you have demonstrated the courage of your convictions to offer fresh foods that are culturally diverse and that can promote improved health.”

“The acceptance of an award like this from my hometown has deep confirming ties,” he said. This comment comes from a decorated man. Bouley’s restaurant ventures have garnered a Michelin Star, several James Beard Foundation awards, a 2015 best restaurant in (more…)

CAHNR in the news

newspaper readersSome of CAHNR’s people, places and programs made the news recently. The bolded topics are linked to initial media coverage. The roman text links go to additional information.

Washington Post. 4-14-17. Described the courtship and marriage of Courtney Gaine and Chris Cuddy. Gaine is an alumna of the Department of Allied Health Sciences.

UConn Today (video). 4-17-17. Posted a video of UConn student entrepreneurs, which included Christian Allyn, a horticulture and resource economics major. Allyn started a business removing invasive plants.

FOX61.com. 4-17-17. Interviewed Laura Cisneros and aired video (embedded second on the bolded linked page) of the summer Natural Resources Conservation Academy, as part of its annual Camp Week series. Cisneros, a visiting assistant professor in natural resources and the environment, described the academy as a summer program for Connecticut’s high school students with two parts. The on-campus segment teaches the scientific method as the students go outdoors and study the local environment and conservation topics. (more…)

Research study shows eggs decrease bad cholesterol, increase good

Left to right: Maria-Luz Fernandez, Diana DiMarco and Bruno Lemos

Left to right: Maria-Luz Fernandez, Diana DiMarco and Bruno Lemos

Once maligned for raising plasma cholesterol levels, eggs are gaining favor as an inexpensive dietary source of protein, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals and are now considered a safe addition to a healthy diet.

Diana DiMarco, PhD candidate in the Department of Nutritional Sciences, completed a clinical study on egg consumption involving thirty-seven healthy adults between the ages of eighteen and thirty, both male and female with varying diet and exercise habits. The study was funded through the Esperance Family Foundation and the Egg Nutrition Center.

“Our goal of the study was to look at a number of biomarkers for cardiovascular disease,” DiMarco says. “We wanted to get an overall picture of what was happening while eating these different numbers of eggs.”

(more…)

New project aims to harness student power to assist Connecticut towns with climate adaptation planning

Climate Corps - Living Shoreline Workshop

A Living Shoreline workshop organized by Juliana Barrett held on the Avery Point campus as part of the Climate Adaptation Academy (CAA). The Climate Corps builds on the success of the CAA, an organization that provides municipalities with information and tools to help them adapt to a changing climate.

Uniting faculty members from the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, School of Engineering, Center for Land Use and Research (CLEAR), and Connecticut Sea Grant, the Climate Corps will serve Connecticut communities by assisting with analyzing climate impact and presenting adaptation strategies while providing a unique learning opportunity for undergraduates.

Students in the Climate Corps will engage in classroom teaching and service learning to develop valuable workplace skills. The program is divided into two components, featuring instruction in the fall semester and a practicum in the spring. Students will learn about climate change and public policy in a new team-taught course entitled: Climate Resilience and Adaptation: Municipal Policy and Planning; then, in the following semester, they will form teams and, with the help of faculty mentors, work with local administrators in communities across the state to support climate adaptation planning. Students will directly assist town officials by preparing assessments of vulnerable areas, structures and systems. They will present ideas on how to prepare for the challenges and suggest methods to acclimate to a changing climate. The goal is to provide municipalities with data, models, forecasts, policies and information on costs so officials can make informed decisions to manage the risks their communities face. The program will draw its students from the Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies and Environmental Engineering majors. Four Connecticut communities will participate in the first year. (more…)

CAHNR in the news

Students with mobile devicesSome of CAHNR’s people, places and programs made the news recently. The bolded topics are linked to initial media coverage. The roman text links go to additional information.

Daily Campus. 3-30-17. Reported on a seminar hosted by the Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture and given by Zeyaur Khan, who works at the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology and is a faculty member at Cornell University. Khan spoke of his advances in pesticide-free control using native perennial forage species as both deterrents and trap crops.

UConn Today. 4-5-17. Referred to the Agricultural Extension Service as a training resource in the World War I effort. 500 women learned about food conservation, milk testing, canning methods and some military skills and then became trainers for about 30,000 others throughout Connecticut. That Extension group is now referred to as UConn Extension.

YouTube. 4-5-17. Posted a video, narrated by Professor Nancy Rodriguez, of a group doing yoga. Research done by Rodriguez, who is on the faculty of nutritional sciences, indicates that yoga paired with adequate dietary protein is beneficial to people as they age. This video is part of the UConn Science in Seconds series. See also UConn Today. 4-6-17.

By Patsy Evans