University of Connecticut University of UC Title Fallback Connecticut

Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

CAHNR in the news

newsprintSome of CAHNR’s people, places and programs made the news recently. The bolded topics are linked to initial media coverage. The roman text links go to additional information.

The Day. 3-30-17. Quoted Michael Dietz, an associate cooperative extension educator, in an article about New England’s rainfall extremes.

UConn Today (video). 4-11-17. Posted a video of students doing a taste test of different types of chocolate in a vanilla UConn ice cream base. Assistant Professor in the Department of Animal Science Dennis D’Amico commented on the science behind this sensory evaluation.

Daily Campus. 4-11-17. Included a photo of the Jacobson Barn and surrounding CAHNR facilities in an article about UConn ranking in the top 20 public colleges.

By Patsy Evans

Meet undergraduate Tessa Kell

TessaKell

Tessa Kell

In addition to two minors and a major in pathobiology, Tessa Kell has participated in stem cell research through the UConn-TIP Bioscience, Entrepreneurship & STEM Internship Program (UConn-TIP). This 10-week summer internship program connects UConn students with start-up companies that operate right here on campus. Tessa worked in the STEM area of the program where she set up experiments to test the effectiveness of a drug intended to treat multiple sclerosis. Follow Tessa’s journey as a CAHNR student and undergraduate researcher.

What attracted you to UConn? When I was first looking into colleges, I was interested in a science major, but I was not certain which career I wanted to pursue. The pathobiology program here at UConn is a unique program. It offers broad range of potential opportunities that can lead to med school, vet school, research careers, or careers in public health. When I came to visit, I was introduced to students doing all of these things. Pathobiology seemed like a good marriage of all of my interests. (more…)

UConn Dairy Science: Home to one of nation’s top dairy herds, maker of legendary ice cream

MCCconeA scoop of Salted Caramel Crunch and a scoop of Toasted Almond Amaretto nestle together in a cup. If you can, let it sit for five minutes so the ice cream just begins to melt, creating a little pool in the bottom of the cup. (In July, this step is not required.) Now, spoon a small amount from each sphere, saucing it with some of the liquid from the bottom of the cup.
Oh. My. Goodness.

This mini-miracle must be the result of some sort of wizardry: Milk from the cows on Horsebarn Hill goes into the shiny steel vats of the UConn Creamery. A spell is cast, and poof! The best ice cream in the world appears. But there’s no magic here; what makes this sublime treat is passion, hard work and scrupulous attention to detail—along with the best ingredients you can get.

UConn’s ice cream begins with the milking cows in the Kellogg Dairy Center (KDC) on Horsebarn Hill, just about 700 yards from the Dairy Bar. (The cows you see grazing on the hill are their not-yet-bred daughters, called heifers.) The UConn Department of Animal Science’s dairy herd is a mix of Holsteins and Jerseys, and a remarkable group of dams it is. The herd has just been ranked by the venerable Hoard’s Dairyman as one of the top twenty of approximately 47,000 dairy herds in the country, receiving a gold ”Best of the Best” National Dairy Quality Award. This accomplishment, extraordinary in itself, is made all the more so by the fact that many of those who tend to the cows are students studying dairy management and milk production in an experiential learning environment. Only one other university herd, from the University of Wisconsin, made the Hoard’s list. The list recognizes milk quality, the primary measure of which is the milk’s somatic cell count (SCC). The lower the number of somatic cells in the milk, the better the animals’ health and the longer the shelf life and finer the quality of the dairy products made from it. This starts to explain why the ice cream’s so good.

(more…)

Meet new faculty member and alumnus Michael Puglisi

Michael Puglisi

Michael Puglisi

Michael Puglisi has come full circle. Having received his PhD in nutritional sciences from UConn in 2008, he worked in research labs in Nashville, Tennessee, and on public health initiatives in Brooklyn, New York, and North Carolina. Now he is returning to UConn as an assistant extension professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences and coordinating the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) for the state of Connecticut.

Where did you get your degrees?

I received my BS degree in dietetics from the University of Delaware, my MS in nutrition in sports and chronic disease from Virginia Tech and my PhD at UConn in nutritional sciences. It’s good to be back at UConn!

What did you do before you came to UConn?

I went through the whole spectrum of the field of nutrition. After graduating from UConn, I went to Vanderbilt University and completed a post-doc in inflammation and the effects on insulin sensitivity and how different dietary fatty acids affect that. So, I went from human research to animal and cell research.

(more…)

CAHNR in the news

Students with mobile devicesSome of CAHNR’s people, places and programs made the news recently. The bolded topics are linked to media coverage. The roman text links go to additional information.

Swimming World. 2-15-17. Announced that UConn swept the podium in the women’s one meter diving event on day one of the American Athletic Conference Championships. Department of Nutritional Sciences student Monica Marcello was part of the team with 280.85 points.

The Register Citizen. 2-16-17. Gave details about the upcoming Annual Horse Symposium at UConn in its news section. This Department of Animal Science event will be held on March 4 and 5. See also: The Dolphin. 2-16-17.

Daily Campus. 2-20-17. Reported on a talk given by Anoushka Concepcion about the technology involved in the propagation and cultivation of Connecticut native sugar kelp as a food sourceConcepcion is an assistant cooperative extension educator in the Department of Extension. (more…)