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Archive for the ‘Animals’ Category

Historical image of the week

Pasture Day (spring Hill), Connecticut Agricultural College

Pasture Day (spring Hill), Connecticut Agricultural College. By Jerauld A. Manter, 1928. From the UConn Libraries Archives and Special Collections.

Meet undergraduate Chelsea Santa Lucia

Chelsea Santa Lucia

Chelsea Santa Lucia

A love of horses led Chelsea Santa Lucia on her journey toward a career in equine medicine, and that same love drives her to succeed in a variety of horse-related activities. Santa Lucia began horseback riding in sixth grade and by high school was a camp counselor with City Slickers in Harwinton, Connecticut, teaching the basics of horseback riding. She will graduate in May 2017 with a bachelor’s degree in animal science and a minor in therapeutic horsemanship. Santa Lucia was a volunteer riding instructor for students with special needs, is a member of the UConn Western Team and a riding instructor on campus, in addition to serving as a College Ambassador. Here is what she said about her experiences as a CAHNR student.

What attracted you to UConn? I loved what the animal science program had to offer. It’s great having easy access to the variety of animals right on campus. Also, on meeting with the staff, I so impressed with how friendly everyone was, and from day one how eager they were to get to know me as a student. Being only an hour away from home was another big plus. It gives me the option to go home some weekends to work at the Wolcott Veterinary Clinic and to see my family.

Why did you choose your particular major? I chose to be an animal science major because of my love for animals and desire to be a veterinarian. The animal science program offered me hands-on experience working directly with the animals my first semester, which was exactly what I was looking for. I also have a minor in therapeutic horsemanship education.

Which one of your UConn activities, internships or jobs was the most memorable? Last semester, as part of fulfilling my minor, I interned for the therapeutic riding program at Camp Care Inc., in Columbia, Connecticut. I LOVED it! Being an intern gave me the opportunity to work closely with children and adults of all ages, and I learned so much about the field and being a therapeutic riding instructor. It also gave me insight on how to manage a therapeutic riding program, from taking care of the horses to scheduling and teaching lessons. The children I worked with were so happy and enjoyed being able to ride, which made my time there that much better! (more…)

CAHNR in the news

newsprintSome of CAHNR’s people, places and programs made the news recently. The bolded topics are linked to initial media coverage. The roman text links go to additional information.

The Day. 3-30-17. Quoted Michael Dietz, an associate cooperative extension educator, in an article about New England’s rainfall extremes.

UConn Today (video). 4-11-17. Posted a video of students doing a taste test of different types of chocolate in a vanilla UConn ice cream base. Assistant Professor in the Department of Animal Science Dennis D’Amico commented on the science behind this sensory evaluation.

Daily Campus. 4-11-17. Included a photo of the Jacobson Barn and surrounding CAHNR facilities in an article about UConn ranking in the top 20 public colleges.

By Patsy Evans

Meet undergraduate Deanna Puchalski

Deanna Puchalski

Deanna Puchalski

Deanna Puchalski grew up in Middlefield, Connecticut. For more than a decade, her family has operated Laurel Brook Farm where she cares for the horses, goats and chickens in addition to assisting with riding lessons, summer camps and clinics held at the farm. As a pre-vet animal science major, she plans to become a practicing large animal veterinarian. Puchalski enjoys her role as a University tour guide, as well as an animal science mentor. Here is what she said about her experiences as a CAHNR student.

What attracted you to UConn? Being a larger institution, UConn offers an amazing quantity and quality of opportunities and resources to its students, but at the same time, it provides a small school feel. UConn has strong academic programs, especially in science, and I knew that I would be exposed to beneficial experiences here that would impact my future. UConn also has a great network of alumni who are always welcoming when students reach out to them, and I have definitely benefited from a few UConn alumni in the veterinary field who have mentored me and given valuable career advice.

Why did you choose your particular major? I first heard about animal science at Accepted Students Day, when Dr. Steven Zinn, the department head, spoke about the major and what it entails. Animal science as a major provides both academic and practical experience in dealing with animals and their health, nutrition, etc. My major would also give me the opportunity to work further with the farm animals on campus, which I appreciated since I want to work with farm animals in the future. In addition to offering courses in animal science topics of interest, I’m on a pre-vet track, so my major works to incorporate all the prerequisites for veterinary school. (more…)

CAHNR in the news

newsprintSome of CAHNR’s people, places and programs made the news recently. The bolded topics are linked to initial media coverage. The roman text links go to additional information.

YouTube. 3-20-17. Posted the testimonial of Richard Dodakian, who suffered exertional heat stroke at the Falmouth Road Race. His life was saved by Korey Stringer Institute staff members. One of those people is Robert Huggins, a postdoctoral fellow in kinesiology, who is on the video.

New York Times. 3-21-17. Quoted Lindsay DiStefano, an associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology, who spoke of the benefits of physical activity in the classroom.

tctMD. 3-21-17. Announced a research conclusion that there is “no convincing evidence of measurable verbal or nonverbal memory dysfunction due to statin medication.” These findings come from the research of Associate Professor Beth Taylor, who a faculty member in the Department of Kinesiology. (more…)