University of Connecticut University of UC Title Fallback Connecticut

Archive for the ‘Alumni’ Category

College alumni create thriving online businesses

Andrew Marcus and Jesse Silkoff

Andrew Marcus (left) and Jesse Silkoff (right).

After meeting their freshman year on the UConn Men’s Tennis team in 2007, Jesse Silkoff and Andrew Marcus are now business partners, running MyTennisLessons and FitnessTrainer.com out of Austin, Texas. Their online companies help match clients searching for a tennis coach or personal trainer in their local area. Silkoff and Marcus both earned degrees in applied and resource economics from the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics. Their path to becoming business owners began before leaving UConn in 2011.

During their senior year, Silkoff and Marcus entered a business plan competition held by the Connecticut Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CCEI) in the School of Business. The competition was university-wide, open to all students regardless of major or academic level. Seventy-six teams entered the competition with their plans being judged by a panel that included several business executives. Silkoff and Marcus won the top prize of $10,000 for their promising strategy for their proposal entitled Tennis Professionals.

(more…)

CAHNR in the news

Students with mobile devicesSome of CAHNR’s people, places and programs made the news recently. The bolded topics are linked to media coverage. The roman text links go to additional information.

UConn Alumni website. 12-21-16. Highlighted alumnus Tony Bachiochi’s role in starting a homey Willimantic coffee shop with the farmers’ interests in mind. Bachiochi got his degree in resource economics in 2015, and his business is called Grounded Coffee Company.

By Patsy Evans

CAHNR in the news

newspaper readersSome of CAHNR’s people, places and programs made the news recently. The bolded topics are linked to media coverage. The roman text links go to additional information.

Brattleboro Reformer. 12-10, 11-16. Reported that Denise “Jane” Ashworth, a  College alumna with two degrees in horticulture, published her first children’s book at age 99.

WNPR. 12-13-16. Pointed out that buying local can include more than produce. In the article, Stacey Stearns, a program specialist in the department of extension,  mentioned other ways Connecticut citizens can be locavores.

UConn Today. 12-16-16. Cited research that showed that black youth were exposed to more junk food advertising than other kids who did not watch black-targeted networks.  Co-author of the study, published in Pediatric Obesity, is Associate Professor Jennifer Harris of allied health sciences. See also The Washington Post. 12-15-16,  CBS Philly. 12-16-16,  NewsOne. 12-19-16, Fox News. 12-20-16 and The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education . 1-3-17.

(more…)

Meet alumna Lauren Danner

Lauren DannerCollege alumna Lauren Danner was named Connecticut Teacher of the Year for 2017. After working for ten years as a research scientist, she found her calling as a teacher. She now shares her passion for science with high school students in North Branford, Connecticut. Here is what she said in an interview.

What was your major in the College? When did you graduate? With what degree?

My major was in diagnostic genetic sciences and I graduated in 1997 with a bachelor of science in that program.

What class was most useful to you?

Once I began taking classes within my major during the last two years, I loved all the classes. The most useful experience, and something I still use to this day, are all the techniques that I learned in my cytogenetics lab courses. All of the experiments that we did in those courses and learning how to conduct specific lab techniques and procedures were invaluable, and I still use that knowledge in my classes now as a teacher with students as they conduct lab work. Prior to teaching, I was a scientist for ten years and those courses really built a great foundation for me. (more…)

Registered dietitian treats eating disorders and promotes worksite health through preventive care

Jennifer Buden

Jennifer Buden.

The ability to combine learning and hands-on experience in nutritional counseling drew Jennifer Buden to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics in the Department of Allied Health Sciences as an undergraduate. The program, one of the few of its kind in New England, offers an opportunity for students to apply their practicum work and classroom training to meet accreditation criteria to prepare for the exam to become registered dietitians. After completing the program, Buden elected to continue on at UConn to earn her master’s degree in health promotion sciences.

“As a senior, I was offered the opportunity to work with Dr. [Pouran] Faghri on her research,” says Buden. “I was interested in worksite wellness programs to intervene, counsel and educate individuals with chronic conditions or those seeking preventive care to effect long-term lifestyle changes to their behaviors. I also hoped to strengthen the connections I had made at UConn. When I become a graduate student, I was involved in the Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention and Policy, learning how to assist individuals and community groups with strategies to reduce their risk of chronic disease and minimize the associated health care costs.”

Buden also became a part of a team of researchers conducting a groundbreaking study on the health of correctional employees.

According to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 70 percent of adults over the age of twenty are overweight or obese. This epidemic puts a majority of the population at increased risk for health complications from high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke. In an effort to combat this mounting crisis, researchers have been studying the workplace to determine factors that might be responsible for poor health behaviors and as a site to promote positive health through policies, programs and resources. Corrections officers have been identified as a group that experiences these health threats at rates higher than the general adult population. (more…)